Uncategorized

182 vehicles booked this year for overloading

One hundred and eighty-two (182) vehicles have been booked by the Land Transport Authority (LTA) for overloading in the first quarter of 2016. A total of eleven (11) vehicles were booked for carrying an excess load of more than 20 tonnes of which one truck was overloaded by 34 tonnes. Twenty-five (25) vehicles were caught […]

Nacanieli Tuilevuka

April 11, 2016 10:07 am

One hundred and eighty-two (182) vehicles have been booked by the Land Transport Authority (LTA) for overloading in the first quarter of 2016.

Land Transport Authority CEO, Naisa Tuinaceva.
Land Transport Authority CEO, Naisa Tuinaceva.

A total of eleven (11) vehicles were booked for carrying an excess load of more than 20 tonnes of which one truck was overloaded by 34 tonnes. Twenty-five (25) vehicles were caught carrying an excess load of over 15 tonnes while another twenty-five (25) trucks were booked for carrying an excess load of more than 10 tonnes.

Other vehicles were booked for carrying an excess load of one (1) tonne up to ten (10) tonnes.

LTA Chief Executive Officer, Mr Naisa Tuinaceva said excess loading is causing the deterioration of the road system and can also have an adverse effect on road safety.

The consequences of carrying excess load can be deadly as not only does it reduce the lifespan of roads and vehicles, but it also reduces the effectiveness of brakes and suspension, resulting in a significant impairment of the driver’s ability to brake and steer properly, which puts the driver and other road users at risk.

Excessive load has caused bridges to break in the past, and there is also an increase in the number of overloaded vehicles involved in road accidents and incidents.

Mr Tuinaceva added that overloaded vehicles are unstable especially at corners and roundabouts and overtaking also takes longer, and this is quite risky for road users.

Excessive weight on the road leads to fatigue cracking, rutting and can also cause structural damage. LTA booked 155 overloaded vehicles in the Central Eastern region while 27 hauliers copped fines in the Northern region in the first quarter. Altogether, the Authority inspected 459 vehicles in 15 different locations in both regions.

Mr Tuinaceva revealed overloading is costing the Fijian Government millions of dollars annually on road maintenance which is separate from the construction of new roads and other capital works.

Around $50 million to $60 million is spent on our roads annually for extra maintenance and renewal purposes – this is a huge and valuable amount that could be useful elsewhere. Therefore, we are reminding the road hauliers to respect the laws of our country, help reduce damages to our roads and to maintain road safety.

The excess load is considered an offence under the LTA Act and the regulated minimum fine is $1,000 per tonne. However, fines may increase depending on the capacity of the vehicle and the load it is carrying.

The Authority will conduct excess load operations throughout the year.

What do you think? Leave a comment below.