TC Winston

FICAC steps in to prevent corruption post-Winston

The Fiji Independent Commission Against Corruption (FICAC) has partnered with DISMAC, NDMO and Divisional Commissioner’s office to maintain transparency and accountability during rehabilitation operations post-Cyclone Winston. A statement released today said this approach has been taken to minimise the likelihood of abuse by public officers during the rehabilitation process. While weather alone does not create […]

Newsroom

March 4, 2016 3:32 pm

The Fiji Independent Commission Against Corruption (FICAC) has partnered with DISMAC, NDMO and Divisional Commissioner’s office to maintain transparency and accountability during rehabilitation operations post-Cyclone Winston.

A statement released today said this approach has been taken to minimise the likelihood of abuse by public officers during the rehabilitation process.

While weather alone does not create corruption and fraud, studies have shown it creates conditions in which those crimes can thrive.

FICAC Officers take on roles as “Liaison Officers” acting in advisory positions, providing support at a time when human resource are stretched. This is a

The need to engage with DISMAC and its operation stems from what FICAC has established from previous audit reports about reported allegations of abuse and mishandling of funds and resources for past disaster relief operations.

According to FICAC, kickbacks and advantages have emerged as a common corrupt practice during disaster procurement of items as logisticians and warehouse managers during this time have discretionary powers to influence purchasing and contracting decisions.

Our presence is to ensure that the system is transparent and accountable so that aid will reach the people who need it.

FICAC said false delivery dockets may be made.

(This would) indicate a high number of materials being purchased while in fact the lower number of items may be delivered to the required areas.

Supplies may be diverted to areas where the officials would want it to go first giving rise to favouritism.

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