Prisons

Fiji Corrections Services reviews inmate rehab programmes

The Fiji Corrections Service (FCS) is reviewing its inmate rehabilitation programmes offered by external providers. FCS yesterday invited stakeholders to discuss the effectiveness of the programmes currently in place. Opening the discussion, FCS Assistant Commissioner (Operations) Jo Kulinidilo said: We would like to see the effectiveness of the programs and the results produced and we […]

Peni Shute

January 27, 2016 9:32 am

The Fiji Corrections Service (FCS) is reviewing its inmate rehabilitation programmes offered by external providers.

Acting Commissioner (Operations) Jo Kulinidilo, Director Rehabilitation Sakiusa Veiwili and Supervisor Central Eastern Division Salote Panapasa at the discussion with rehab program providers. PHOTO: Fiji Corrections Services.
Acting Commissioner (Operations) Jo Kulinidilo, Director Rehabilitation Sakiusa Veiwili and Supervisor Central Eastern Division Salote Panapasa at the discussion with rehab program providers. PHOTO: Fiji Corrections Services.

FCS yesterday invited stakeholders to discuss the effectiveness of the programmes currently in place.

Opening the discussion, FCS Assistant Commissioner (Operations) Jo Kulinidilo said:

We would like to see the effectiveness of the programs and the results produced and we hope teams or committees can be established after this discussion to determine which programs are most effective in reforming inmates.

Mr Kulinidilo  emphasised the need to prioritise rehab so that the rate of recidivism or recurring imprisonment was reduced.

We need to focus on what an inmate has to support himself upon release. This could be in the form of a job, support, housing and they need to be informed about these things. These are ways to prevent them from reoffending.

FCS Director Rehabilitation Sakiusa Veiwili said there was a need for programme providers to understand each other’s role, the risk levels involved and the areas of need that had to be addressed.

Usually the program providers conduct their programs and move on. We wanted to get them together and explain their objectives, program targets and which areas of need they address. After their presentations, we will able to identify who fits where and whether they should come in at the initial, middle or later stage of incarceration.

Mr Veiwili said programme providers should work collectively and not in isolation.

Participants from 20 organisations attended the discussion and a similar event will be held this Thursday for church, community and ministry and department representatives.

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