Police

Senior Police officers undergo child protection workshop

Police officers need to be more aware of child protection laws, to approach underage victims in a less hostile manner and to look for ways to assist those under the age of 18 to engage in more positive activities. This was the message emphasized during a four-day workshop facilitated by UNCEF’s Child Protection Specialist Ms […]

Salote Qalubau

June 19, 2016 9:20 am

Police officers need to be more aware of child protection laws, to approach underage victims in a less hostile manner and to look for ways to assist those under the age of 18 to engage in more positive activities.

(Left) SSP Josese Lako (and SSP Aporosa Lutunauga during the UNICEF workshop.( Fiji Police Force)
(Left) SSP Josese Lako (and SSP Aporosa Lutunauga during the UNICEF workshop.( Fiji Police Force)

This was the message emphasized during a four-day workshop facilitated by UNCEF’s Child Protection Specialist Ms Salote Kaimacuata.

The workshop was an opportunity for the officers at senior management level to revisit important legislations pertaining to child protection such as the Child Welfare Decree, Juvenile Act, Domestic Violence Decree as well as the 2013 Constitution.

Assistant Commissioner of Police Inspector General Assistant Isikeli Vuniwaqa said the was a chance to see things from a new perspective.

VUNIWAQA: “What we have learnt over the last few days has given us a new insight on how to see and deal with children. We’ve had our own experiences as police officers and now we have a better understanding of the dynamics of dealing with children and how our approach can also assist them from being on the wrong side of the law constantly.”

Workshop facilitator Salote Kaimacuata said the workshop was a way for officers to better understand that a different level of understanding and patience was needed when handling children.

KAMAICUATA: “You want children to be able to talk to you and not fear you. Your approach to them can give them the confidence and trust to talk to you about things confronting them. If someone under 18 is a suspect of a crime, your initial approach with them can ultimately lead them away from a life of crime, if you show understanding and try to see why the child had committed a crime to begin with.”

ACP Vuniwaqa acknowledged UNICEF’s support in working with the Fiji Police’s Juvenile Bureau and said as senior managers they would do their best to ensure what they’ve learnt will be reflected through their services.

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