August 30, 2016 3:27 pm

New medical equipment to boost Neurosurgery Unit operations

The Australian High Commissioner, Margaret Twomey, handed over new medical equipment to the Colonial War Memorial Hospital’s Neurosurgery Unit in Suva yesterday. The medical equipment, consisting of an Aesculap electric neurosurgery bone drill, is a vital part of the neurosurgery equipment that allows access to the brain and spine. The medical equipment was funded by […]

The Australian High Commissioner, Margaret Twomey, handed over new medical equipment to the Colonial War Memorial Hospital’s Neurosurgery Unit in Suva yesterday.

Dr. Luisa Cikamatana receives the new Aesculap electric neuro-surgery drill from the Australian High Commissioner, Margaret Twomey. (AHC)
Dr. Luisa Cikamatana receives the new Aesculap electric neurosurgery drill from the Australian High Commissioner, Margaret Twomey. (AHC)

The medical equipment, consisting of an Aesculap electric neurosurgery bone drill, is a vital part of the neurosurgery equipment that allows access to the brain and spine.

The medical equipment was funded by Australia’s Direct Aid Program (DAP) following a request by the hospital’s Neurosurgery Unit for support after its specialized bone drill had become inoperative last year.

TWOMEY: “The benefits of this specialized equipment will mean that the Neurosurgery Unit will have shorter operating times, and safer, more efficient access to sensitive areas of the brain and spine.”

Project Coordinator, Dr Alan Biribo said many lives will benefit from the equipment.

BIRIBO: “It gives me much happiness that the hard work of hospital staff and the goodwill of the Australian Government and its people have culminated in the arrival of our new Aesculap electric neurosurgery drill at CWM Hospital. I cannot tell you how ecstatic my team and I were when we received this. Many lives will undoubtedly benefit from this new equipment.”

The Neurosurgery unit was established in 2013 with the assistance of the Australian Capital Territory Health Department, and the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

The Unit has performed close to 450 neurological procedures, including on brain and spine tumours, trauma and congenital malformations. A large part of its work is responding to emergencies such as car accidents.

CWM is the only hospital in Fiji to have a full-time neurosurgeon that has trained and worked in Australia prior to returning to Fiji to commence in the newly opened Neurosurgery unit.

The Australian High Commission’s Direct Aid Program is a community development program funded by the Australian Government that supports projects with a strong development focus that complement Australia’s broader aid program.