Health

More than 500 kidney failures annually

Around 500 to 600 people are diagnosed with kidney failure every year in Fiji with 65 percent due to diabetes. Prevention and early detection of kidney disease was one of the key messages highlighted by the Minister for Health Jone Usamate at the Nephrology Symposium held in Suva on Thursday. Nephrology is a branch of […]

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September 19, 2015 8:33 pm

Around 500 to 600 people are diagnosed with kidney failure every year in Fiji with 65 percent due to diabetes.

Prevention and early detection of kidney disease was one of the key messages highlighted by the Minister for Health Jone Usamate at the Nephrology Symposium held in Suva on Thursday.

Nephrology is a branch of medicine involved in the care of people with kidney disease and related conditions.

Dr Neil Sharma, Dr Josefa Koroivueta and participant at the symposium. Photo: Department of Information.
Dr Neil Sharma, Dr Josefa Koroivueta and participant at the symposium. Photo: Department of Information.

The first-ever Nephrology Symposium in Fiji gathered various dialysis units and stakeholders to raise awareness and knowledge on kidney disease and its treatment available in Fiji.

“The Health Ministry recognises that there are many facets to the care of patients with kidney disease. Kidney transplants, while they cannot be done in Fiji, can be carried out abroad and several patients have travelled to India for transplants,” Usamate said.

Mr Usamate added the Health Ministry recognises the need to support patients who may not be able to pursue dialysis or transplant.

The Health Minister said 50 to 100 people require dialysis treatment every year for acute kidney injury or failure.

Minister Usamate said the symposium is an opportunity for stakeholders to identify dialysis services available in Fiji and partner with private/public organisations to further improve and advocate on end-stage kidney disease.

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