Health

Diabetes is our ‘top killer’, ranking Fiji second in the world

The President Major-General (Ret’d) Jioji Konousi Konrote met with mid-management officials of the Ministry of Health and Medical services on Non-Communicable Diseases at the Colonial War Memorial Hospital (CWMH) Auditorium in Suva today. Fiji is ranked second in the world with a high rate of deaths from diabetes.  According to the World Life Expectancy diabetes […]

Nacanieli Tuilevuka

July 26, 2016 1:46 pm

The President Major-General (Ret’d) Jioji Konousi Konrote met with mid-management officials of the Ministry of Health and Medical services on Non-Communicable Diseases at the Colonial War Memorial Hospital (CWMH) Auditorium in Suva today.

His Excellency the President Major-General (Ret'd) Jioji Konousi Konrote. (Fijian Government)
His Excellency the President Major-General (Ret’d) Jioji Konousi Konrote. (Fijian Government)

Fiji is ranked second in the world with a high rate of deaths from diabetes.  According to the World Life Expectancy diabetes report, Fiji had an age-adjusted death rate of 147 (146.5) people for every 100,000 deaths.

Mauritius recorded the highest at a rate of 173.6 per 100,000 deaths, as listed by the survey that used latest data from the World Health Organization.

President Konrote said that diabetes was Fiji’s top killer within the long list of NCDs resulting in more Fijians losing two lower limbs per day due to amputations.

KONROTE: “I learnt that diabetes is Fiji’s top killer within the long list of NCDs. I also learnt that more Fijians are losing two lower limbs per day due to amputations because of diabetes.A report on Fiji’s health status for the past 30 years shows an increasing trend in diabetes, high blood pressure and obesity.”

“NCDs contribute to about 80 percent of deaths below the age of 70 Years. This is confirmed by the World Health Organisation, which reports that Fiji has the second highest rate of NCD-related deaths in the Pacific.”

He said the burden and threat of NCDs was a major public health challenge that undermined social and economic development in the country.

KONROTE: “At the recent NCD-Summit in Tonga, the World Bank estimated that the economic burden of NCDs in Fiji if Business as usual continues would be U.S. 213.58 Million Dollars by 2030. This is projected to increase to U.S. 342.37 Million Dollars by 2040.”

“The World Bank noted that the biggest driver of lost output/ outcome is the potential loss of labour due to early deaths from NCDs. It says that the potential loss of effective labour force by 2040 in Fiji will be 16.4%. Heart Diseases will contribute to 60% of this burden; Diabetes 24%; Cancers 8% and Lung Diseases 7%.”

President Konrote said he had also had fruitful discussions with NCD’s national adviser Dr Isimeli Tukana.

KONROTE: “I wish to recommend a few pointers for your consideration. These emanated from discussions I have had with Dr. Tukana We should all quit smoking and declare all our work places Tobacco Free, We should not allow unhealthy foods and drinks to be served, eaten nor sold in all Ministry of Health and Medical Services facilities and We should be responsible in our drinking of alcohol and kava.”

He added that the general public needed to make every effort to reduce obesity in the workforce by exercising daily and promoting physical activity in our workplaces.

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